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29
Jan

#Play Separate Tables

JANUARY


17. Separate Tables by Terence Rattigan by Terence Rattigan Terence Rattigan


Finish date: 28 January 2022
Genre: Play
Rating: A
Review:

Good news: Setting: The guests gather for a life-changing night at the Beauregard Hotel in
…Bournemouth, an English seaside resort town. We look at the lives of several residents. Guests who have their meals at Separate Tables. We see this all the time…people do not connect.

Good news: This is an absolutely classic English play! Written 1950’s Rattigan’s play develops familiar themes of loneliness, humiliation and the self appointed moral jurors in the private hotel. Rattigan draws on his own world. He dissects the known realities of the upper-middle-class. Separate Tables is touching, subtle and proof how …small minds (Lady Railton-Bell) can problematise the unproblematic

Personal: Reading tip: try to put faces on the characters before reading. I used the actors/actresses in the 1958 movie version of the play: Rita Hayworth, Deborah Kerr, David Niven and Burt Lancaster. Niven won Best Actor Oscar 1959 for his staring role in the movie.
#MustRead…it takes about an hour of your reading time!

28
Jan

#Plays Thornton Wilder

JANUARY

16. The Collected Short Plays of Thornton Wilder, Volume I by Thornton Wilder by Thornton Wilder Thornton Wilder

Finish date: 19 January 2022
Genre: Plays
Rating: D-
Review:

Bad news: The plays felt like homework, outdated lacking in any kind of spark of enjoyment. Every time I started a new play …it was only to get it done and hope the end of the book would put me out of my misery.

Bad news: I still had enough enthusiasm after a good lunch… to start the last 12 one act plays. I only like 2! So it was a very low return on investment. I literally fell asleep reading part II.

Good news: Stage directions: stage appearance, characters arrangement alone or in clusters…that was the best part of the plays I read. I needed some visual to get my through my reading. I will share one for Pullman Car Hiawatha by Harry Feiner Theater Design It helped me so much to understand what was going on in the play. IMO this was the best play in the book because it was so unconventional. Strange play….but oh, what a talent Wilder must have been to create this dialogue!! I liked Wilder’s use of a stage manager that breaks the 4th wall and speaks to the audience.

Personal These are not plays you can just jump into….there is a lot of allegory embedded in Thornton’s writing. Try to at least read a summary of the play beforehand. Here is an excellent resource for many of Wilder’s works…all in one website! The Wilder Society

Thornton Wilder….who mentions his name when asked for 3 great American playwrights? Not me! The spotlight is always on Tennessee Williams, Eugene O’Neill and Arthur Miller. But Wilder is one of the greatest writers of art of allegorical narrative…and that is always difficult to understand and digest. Malcolm Cowley (literary critic 1898-1989) reveals: “(Wilder is) one of the toughest and most complicated minds in contemporary America.” Amen to that!

We all have read Wilder’s play Our Town and he novel The Bridge of San Luis Ray (Pulitzer Prize 1928)..in high-school …so if you’ve read them there is no reason to venture into the one-act plays in this book.
#Disappointed

26
Jan

#NF Dawn of the Belle Epoque

Alfred Sisley:  Fog, Voisins (1874)

 

JANUARY


Dawn of the Belle Epoque The Paris of Monet, Zola, Bernhardt, Eiffel, Debussy, Clemenceau, and Their Friends by Mary McAuliffe by Mary McAuliffe Mary McAuliffe

Finish date: 17 January 2022
Genre: Non-fiction
Rating: A
Review:

Bad news: No book is perfect…but I had to think very hard to find a minus point in this book.
It was long (400 pages). That is a lot to cover in 2 days. I have the next book on my reading list but will have to wait until I digest this one. Rightly Ms McAuliffe touches on the politics and science (..few pages about Mme Cure) in the Belle Epoque. Honestly, I’ve read about – seen movie about The Dreyfus Affair so felt I could skim these pages. Also George Clemeanceau and all his band of merry men…don’t interest me. Also…there were not many illustrations in the book so I had to depend on Wikipedia/Google.

Good news: Now the real reason to read this book is the world of literature, art, music and engineering! 75% of the book is about the wonderful world of French painters who dazzeled the world. We all know the list of names but I fell very much head over heels reading about Pissarro. He tends to fall into the back round when you think about Van Gogh, Renoir, Degas, Manet brothers and Monet. But Camille Pissarro was the father figure who nurtured and held these men together! PS: Did you know Pissarro was born in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands?

Good News Having read bio’s about B. Morisot and V. Hugo I could quickly get through the first chapters. Also I’ve read all 20 of Zola’s Rougon-Macquart books….so references to Nana or L’Assommier, L’Oeuvre were familiar characters to me. I knew nothing about the great 4 composers Claude Debussy, D’Indy, Ravel and the wonderful Saint-Saëns. If you do anything listen to his Carnival des Animaux on Spotify…just breathtaking. This book contains tidbits of information that have slipped between the cracks of Wikipedia!

Good news: There were interesting chapters about the history of
the Pantheon in Paris (…..Victor Hugo thought is a wretched copy of St. Peter’s in Rome!) Statue of Liberty – Eiffel Tower. There were…steamy love affairs: between Debussy and older Mme Vasnier (married). Another affair between Claude Monet and Mme Alice Hoschedé (married) was very touching…they stayed devoted to each other for life! Loved the back round information about Rodin’s famous sculpture “The Kiss”…was it inspired by his affair with Camille Claudel or Dante’s Inferno 2nd level Francesca en Paolo?

Good news: Auguste Escoffier shook-up the world of haute cuisine and created Pêche Melba for Australian singer Nellie Melba and Fraises Bernhardt for Sarah, the great French actress. He was just as revolutionary as anything Rodin, Seurat, Debussy or Gustave Eiffel were doing! He looked at restaurant meals from a woman’s point of view….as every chef should!

Good news: Did I learn something I never heard about? Sarah Bernhardt was not only an actress but also a sculptor. I got a peak at the installation plans for the Statue of Liberty and Tour Eiffel. Learned about the uproar the controversial sculpture The Bronze Age by Rodin created. The model was a Belgian soldier and so lifelike no one believed it was not made with a plaster caste of the body! What a body! (see Wikipedia)

Personal While reading this book I had Spotfy to listen to the music of the composers and Wikipedia to have the many works of art (don’t forget the beautiful Art Nouveau illustrations by Alphonse Mucha….beautiful!) by the painters at my fingertips. It is the best way to read this book. Finally after having collected dust on my TBR for 5 years…I discovered this gem!
#MountTBR2022

25
Jan

#BookBingoBlackout

I learned about this challenge from Tracy’s blog  Bitter Tea and Mystery! I too am joining in on Book Bingo at Unruly Reader. This bingo card can work perfectly with my MountTBR2022 challenge. I’m sure I can find some book on my 1300+ books TBR on Kindle.

It is a basic bingo card where you try to get a bingo or go for blackout.   There are some explanations of the topics but you can interpret as you see fit.

 

 

My Selections:    2/25

Timely Title – book relevant in its own era

 

NYT Best Seller –

 

NEWS – book that affects a region (North East South West)

 

Fleeting fancy – picked up on a whim

 

Seasonal – book that evokes a season

 

Native American Author

 

Positive Psychology – book that explores building a life worth living

 

Subculture – (profession/obsession/pursuit/belief system/set of customs)

 

Afrofuturism – SG/fantasy/tech to explore the African diaspora experience

 

Librarian recommended – Unruly Reader?

 

I-syllable Author Surname – writer 1 sys last name – Art of Racing in the Rain by G. Stein

 

Coming of Age – growth of MC from naivety to maturity

 

Play –

 

Period Piece – book that could only take place in that time

  1. Dawn of the Belle Epoque – M. McAuliffe – READ
JANUARY


14 Dawn of the Belle Epoque The Paris of Monet, Zola, Bernhardt, Eiffel, Debussy, Clemenceau, and Their Friends by Mary McAuliffe by Mary McAuliffe Mary McAuliffe

Finish date: 17 January 2022
Genre: Non-fiction
Rating: A
Review:

Bad news: No book is perfect…but I had to think very hard to find a minus point in this book.
It was long (400 pages). That is a lot to cover in 2 days. I have the next book on my reading list but will have to wait until I digest this one. Rightly Ms McAuliffe touches on the politics and science (..few pages about Mme Cure) in the Belle Epoque. Honestly, I’ve read about – seen movie about The Dreyfus Affair so felt I could skim these pages. Also George Clemeanceau and all his band of merry men…don’t interest me. Also…there were not many illustrations in the book so I had to depend on Wikipedia/Google.

Good news: Now the real reason to read this book is the world of literature, art, music and engineering! 75% of the book is about the wonderful world of French painters who dazzled the world. We all know the list of names but I fell very much head over heels reading about Pissarro. He tends to fall into the back round when you think about Van Gogh, Renoir, Degas, Manet brothers and Monet. But Camille Pissarro was the father figure who nurtured and held these men together! PS: Did you know Pissarro was born in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands?

Good News Having read bio’s about B. Morisot and V. Hugo I could quickly get through the first chapters. Also I’ve read all 20 of Zola’s Rougon-Macquart books….so references to Nana or L’Assommier, L’Oeuvre were familiar characters to me. I knew nothing about the great 4 composers Claude Debussy, D’Indy, Ravel and the wonderful Saint-Saëns. If you do anything listen to his Carnival des Animaux on Spotify…just breathtaking. This book contains tidbits of information that have slipped between the cracks of Wikipedia!

Good news: There were interesting chapters about the history of
the Pantheon in Paris (…..Victor Hugo thought is a wretched copy of St. Peter’s in Rome!) Statue of Liberty – Eiffel Tower. There were…steamy love affairs: between Debussy and older Mme Vasnier (married). Another affair between Claude Monet and Mme Alice Hoschedé (married) was very touching…they stayed devoted to each other for life! Loved the back round information about Rodin’s famous sculpture “The Kiss”…was it inspired by his affair with Camille Claudel or Dante’s Inferno 2nd level Francesca en Paolo?

Good news: Auguste Escoffier shook-up the world of haute cuisine and created Pêche Melba for Australian singer Nellie Melba and Fraises Bernhardt for Sarah, the great French actress. He was just as revolutionary as anything Rodin, Seurat, Debussy or Gustave Eiffel were doing! He looked at restaurant meals from a woman’s point of view….as every chef should!

Good news: Did I learn something I never heard? Sarah Bernhardt was not only an actress but also a sculptor. I got a peak at the installation plans for the Statue of Liberty and Tour Eiffel. Learned about the uproar the controversial sculpture The Bronze Age by Rodin created. The model was a Belgian soldier and so lifelike no one believed it was not made with a plaster caste of the body! What a body! (see Wikipedia)

Personal While reading this book I had Spotify to listen to the music of the composers and Wikipedia to have the many works of art (don’t forget the beautiful Art Nouveau illustrations by Alphonse Mucha….beautiful!) by the painters at my fingertips. It is the best way to read this book. Finally after having collected dust on my TBR for 5 years…I discovered this gem!
#MountTBR2022

 

1980s Classic – published in 1980s and still widely read

 

Time Capsule – about another era….time travel or perspective about current-day on an earlier time

 

Fast – short book or fast paced

 

Slow – book you want to savor, don’t want it to end….of that just won’t end!

 

Wanderlust – character’s journey to another place or your yearning to travel

 

Free Time – smth you can read in 5 min!! (article – poem – blogpost)

 

Ability diverse – character with a physical of cognitive disability

 

One Hit Wonder – author who published one notable book

 

Immersion – book you can’t stop thinking about – Redeployment by Phil Klay

 

Vintage – Vintage Classics published by Penguin Random House

 

Biography – Thomas Becket by John Guy

 

  1. Thomas Becket – John Guy (purchased 11.11 2015) – READ
JANUARY
3. Thomas Becket Warrior, Priest, Rebel, Victim A 900-Year-Old Story Retold by John Guy by John Guy John Guy
Finish date: 05 January 2022
Genre: biography
Rating: B

Review: From my notes I see that the book captured
my interest starting with the “broken relationship” between King Henry II and Thomas Becket in chapter 12. So You have to plod on during the first 40% of
the book that was just a description of a middle class man who climbed the social, academic and political ladder. I was impressed how Becket’s mother was keen to see what her son needed for his future (education etc)

Bad news: some key issues (Constituions of Clarendon 1164, turning point in king-archbishop relationship) took a few chapters to get through. Tip: read about people/issues quickly on Britainexpress.com ( great reference website ) and it will save you time. The chapters can be ‘skimmed’ if you then wish.

Good news: This book really gave me an idea what happened in that period 1120 (birth) – 1170 (murder) – 1220 (veneration of the saint). Focus is on the ruthless, untrustworthy vindictive character of King Henry II and Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury the ambitious, uncompromising zealot and how they clash. Sparks fly!

Personal:The only history about Henry II I knew was from the movie Lion in Winter with Peter O’Toole and Katherine Hepburn. I loved the film. It takes place years after Becket’s murder and I must admit Henry II is painted in the embellishment of Hollywood colors and does not even divulge what (excusez le mot) a badass he was! Hepburn brought Eleanor of Aquitaine alive for me and I’ve read more books about her.

Trivia: Eleanor of Aquitaine was one of the longest living royalty in the Middle Ages…reached the age of 82 and outlived 8 of her 10 children.

#WorthYourReadingTime
24
Jan

#Fiction The Art of Racing in the Rain

#GoMax   “…Keep pushing!!”

 

JANUARY

20. The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein by Garth Stein Garth Stein

Finish date: 22 January 2022
Genre: Fiction
Rating: B+
Review:

Bad news: Push through the first chapters….sentimental as flowers pressed between the pages of a diary.

Good news: A beloved philosopher dog named Enzo is the one who teaches us everything we need to know about being human. Let the story embrace you…every reader will find a moment to connect at some level. I mean a dog is the narrator…what’s not to love?

Good news: My first impression was wrong. This turned out to be a great book…I loved it! Title The Art of Racing in the Rain was just perfect…captures the essence of the book! Drivers are afraid of the rain. Rain amplifies your mistakes.

Good news: I love the sport of Formula 1 so all the references to great champions of the past Emmo (Fittipaldi), Schumi, Senna etc were wonderful. I didn’t realize so many life lessons can be learned in the paddock and on the grid. My life lesson? No race has ever been won in the first corner…but plenty of races have been lost there.

Personal: New rule…never write the book review on the same day you finished the book! Sleep on it. After a few chapters of sugar-spin sentimentality I hoped the book would get better…and it did. Apart from the ‘tear-jerker’ content (dying dog, newlyweds, baby, dying wife and in-laws from hell) the book had a larger message for me. The Art of Racing in the Rain was a metaphor teaching me (us) how to overcome obstacles in the long race we call life (pg 314). We all race in the rain at some point. Remember the motto in the book:
The visible becomes inevitable.
The car goes where the eyes go (ch 37)
With fresh tires and a full load of fuel he would prove a formidable force.

22
Jan

#Novella Captains Courageous

JANUARY

13. Captains Courageous by Rudyard Kipling by Rudyard Kipling Rudyard Kipling

Finish date: 17 January 2022
Genre: novella
Rating: F
Review:

Bad news:
I think this would be one of the most difficult book to teach young readers. Dialogue?
Fergit ut. (forget it) ‘T wuz… (it was…)
They’ll tell that tale again us fer years.
Fwhat’s th good ‘o bodderin’ fwhat…
Ha’af on the taown, and ‘t’ other ha’af blame fool. (awful!)

Bad news: While reading Captains Courageous I had difficulty with the dialogue. Despite my attempt to read the book…while listening to the and audio version the story never appealed to me. Kipling describes the boats, sail, cross-trees, trawl-buoys, rigging
…in excessive nautical detail. Pages and pages of ‘tall tales’ the crew members tell each other …and the ‘sing-alongs’ sounded corny. My only hope was to find some ‘cracker-barrel philosophy’ in the text (somewhere)…that would inspire young readers.

Personal
The book is unbalanced: 70% boats, sea conditions, fishing – 20% the crew – 10% Harvey Kipling eventually rejected the novel as simply a “boy’s story” …and he was right. I doubt a young reader would really enjoy this story.
This book was written in 1897 and times….and children have changed.
#NotFavorite childern’s classic…at all!

20
Jan

#Short stories Isaac Bashevis Singer

 

JANUARY

12. Collected Stories (Isaac Bashevis Singer Classic Editions) by Isaac Bashevis Singer by Isaac Bashevis Singer Isaac Bashevis Singer


Finish date: 15 January 2022
Genre: Short stories
Rating: C
Review:

Bad news: I didn’t have to go far to find the PERFECT words to describe this book.
I found them on page 370 in the story “A Day in Coney Island.
Singer’s friend an editor of a Yiddish paper says it so clearly:
“…no one give a hoot about demons, duybbuks (Yid: wandering souls) and imps of 200 years ago!”


Bad news: Stories are nice, nostalgic but some feel so long and describe just about everything in the village and synagogue! A few stories are TOO long…they feel like novellas.
A lot of devils, the Evil spirit, Satan and imps…sometimes Satan in the narrator and main character!
Sorry, after 5-6 stories about “old Poland” and village life I started to skim them. The stories I most enjoyed took place in Miami Florida or New York City!

Good news: I.B. Singer had the talent to pierce into the hearts of men who are staring at an empty wall and not in the mood for a conversation. (The Cabalist of East Broadway).
Most of the stories are humorous, with an undercurrent of tragedy, and very readable (just sometimes too long as I said earlier). authentically Jewish short stories with wry humor.

Good news:
Style: combined Jewish mysticism with demonology (devils, imps etc)
Nearly all of the stories in this collection make use of the supernatural in some way
Scope: this volume represent roughly one-third of Singer’s published work in short fiction (excluding his children’s books).
Topics: telepathy, clairvoyance, premonition, ability to converse with the dead, Ouija boards, improbable tall tales….about dubbyks (wandering souls), imps and devils.
Theme Individual choice and romantic love thwarted by parental edict and tradition. Singer also touches on “old age”. Some of his most lovable characters were either the doddering, depresssed pensioner or an agelss-in-spirit quirky oddball.


Personal
New rule: Avoid buying collected short stories books by any author…it is just TOO much of a good thing. It took me 2 days to read 40 stories and I skipped about 7. They were the same old narrative: Polish village, frantic marriage matchmakers, frantic mothers, dogmatic rabbis and daughters and sons that just want to live their own life.
My favorite story was The Letter Writer: …connection between a among a solitary man, a mouse, and a lonely woman…will touch a heart string for sure! If you can find this story…enjoy!

I finally can check this book off on my TBR…it has been collecting dust since 18 July 2015.
47 short stories and I really enjoyed 15 …that is only 30%
Many stories felt outdated, old-fashioned tales about life in pre-WW II Polish villages. The best stories took place later in Singer’s life …settings: New York City, Coney Island, Miami, Florida and Tel Aviv, Israel.
Isaac Bashevis Singer won the #Nobel Prize 1978
…and if you can find them…there are some great stories/novels to read!

 

 

 

 

 

 

18
Jan

#Mystery Gaudy Night

Magdalen Bridge, Oxford University (…last scene in the book)

 

JANUARY

11. Gaudy Night (Lord Peter Wimsey, #10) by Dorothy L. Sayers by Dorothy L. Sayers Dorothy L. Sayers

Finish date: 13 January 2022
Genre: novel wrapped in a mystery
Rating: D
Review:

Bad news: The first chapters are all about a bevy of young women meeting at a 10 yr class reunion at Oxford University. There’s no suspense…no tension…no push to propel the plot! Where is the hook?

Bad news: I was NOT given what I expected. I wanted a “scratch your head” puzzle…who is trolling all these academics with threats?
The center of the story….is NOT the poison-pen letters…but Harriet Vane’s issues with marriage!

Good news: Literary challenge – Each chapter is introduced by a quote by an Elizabethan poet/writer and I had fun researching the words mentioned and tied to find the connection Sayers intended to make with that particular chapter.

Bad news: Unfortunately….this literary adventure fizzled out. The clues about the book are so deeply embedded it lofty poetic allusions….I lost interest. This is just not something I was looking for in a mystery.

Examples:

Sir Philip Sidney – (1554-1586) ch 1 – “Thou blind man’s mark, thou fool’s self-chosen snare….” (desire is the snare).
So if desire is a swamp we become lost in, then virtue is the brilliant and guiding sun that leads us out of the it. Once you finish the book this idea could be applicable to the relationship between Harriet Vane and Lord Wimsey)…but you’ll have to get through some soporific (23 chapters) to understand this high moral, intellectual value Sayers wants to give us.
Not what I’m looking for in a mystery!

Robert Burton (1577-1640) ch 2 – “’Tis proper to all melancholy men…”
Burton treats suicide as an outcome of melancholy, depression. One character we NEVER see unfortunately “blows his brains out” ends. Again you must slog through the book to find out who! Not my idea of building tension throughout the book. I read this and asked myself “Who is this character….?”

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) ch 3 – “…They do best who, if they cannot but admit love…”

Is love and marriage are worth…the sacrifice? Need she (Harriet Vane) sacrifice her brain to achieve keeping a husband and a home? “…washing, cooking, feeding the cattle and digging potatoes…these things take the edge of the razor.” (ch 3).

W. Shakespeare (1564-1616) ch 4 – “…Thou canst not, love, disgrace me half so ill,…

Harriet Vane fears the proposed bond of marriage to Lord Wimsey will not be one of of equals.

Personal: If you want to dream away and enter the gothic and hallowed grounds of Oxford University …this is your book. If you want a thrilling, dazzling mystery that will keep you up thinking “whodunnit?” …this is NOT your book. I tired to stay engaged…I tried not falling asleep…I tried to give Dorothy Sayers (one of the Queens of Golden Age English mystery) the respect she deserves but I could not. I did discover Lord Wimsey is the great sleuth….NOT Harriet! He narrows down the list of suspects responsible for poison-pen messages while Harriet sits shell-shocked in the corner of the room!
IMO this would have been a good novel…just a love story and leave the mystery element on the “editing floor”.

 

16
Jan

#CF Kolymsky Heights

Siberia...

JANUARY

10. Kolymsky Heights by Lionel Davidson by Lionel Davidson Lionel Davidson

Finish date: 10 January 2022
Genre: CF
Rating: F-
Review:

Bad news: I found it deadly boring, but I was determined to finish it and after skimming lots of pages (the middle section…completely!!) I managed to get to the moderately exciting last 50 pages. The characters had zero depth, the plot completely implausible, and the writing to be flat. It took “Raven” (main character Johnny Porter) 250 pages to get from Nagasaki-Murmansk 3757 nautical miles on a tramp boat (28 days)….it felt like a lifetime.

Good news: ZILCH!

Personal: I found myself drifting off mid-sentence as the descriptions became ever more elaborate and lengthy. In general, this book was just too long, offering pages of minute details just information on top of information, but not the connection to me as a reader. I would rather do my dirty dishes then read this book! This was a source of invigorating hair-shirt agony.

#TOTAL waste of my reading time….

14
Jan

#Nordic noir The Hunting Dogs

Setting for The Hunting Dogs – Vestfold, Norway

 

JANUARY

9. The Hunting Dogs by Jørn Lier Horst by Jørn Lier Horst Jørn Lier Horst

Finished date: 11 January 2022
Genre: Nordic noir
Rating: B+
Review:

Motives: Lust and…concealment (1 murder is committed to conceal another murder!
Irony: Wisting’s police badge and gun are taken away. Wisting investigates murder case while he himself is being investigated!

Bad news: I jumped into the middle of the William Wisting Nordic noir books (this is the 3rd book in the Wisting Mysteries)….and the case itself in The Hunting Dogs is stand-alone, much of this story’s impact relies on our connection to its characters, and having a bit of background exposure to them will make readers all the more invested in their fates.

Good news: Wisting series (season 1) is streaming on Netflix!

Good news: Title: Police work in an unconscious process like hunting dogs following the scent (pg 91). …like other hunting dogs, they had followed the warmest scent without further thought. (pg 166)

Good news: The hook…
JonasR had received a phone call 14:17 hr that casued him to call a lawyer and arrange a meeting….7 hours later he was dead. The first pages capture my attention, this is why Nordic noir writers are so successful…the hook!  But the book just keeps on giving….so many chapters end with cliffhangers. This is excellent CF writing!

Good news: The book juxtaposes a race against the clock (deadline for newspaper story (Wisting’s daughter is a journalist), tense stakeout trying to catch an ex-criminal (Haglund planning his next murder?) ….in one chapter with a by-the-book interview in a dreary room at Internal Affairs (is Wisting charged with tampering the evidence in Haglund’s conviction?)…the juxtaposition invites the reader to look more closely at the possible relationship between these two situations!!

Good news: The book is divided into 84 chapters!! Yes, 320 pages in 84 chapters and that is a good thing because I read pages like potato chip bites! Chapters are long enough for a quick read (during commute..between household chores) and an excellent place to stick the bookmark. But a funny thing happens when I have a place to pause……I just keep reading!

Personal:
I cannot for the life of me understand why this book did not win Petrona Prize 2015!
The Silence of the Sea was the winner for the judges….but I thought it was poorly written. Jorn Lier Horst is an exceptional Nordic noir writer and would recommend his books to any CF lover or reluctant CF reader like me!