Skip to content

November 12, 2018

16

NonFicNov week 3 Be the Expert

by N@ncy

Week 3: (Nov. 12 to 16) – Be The Expert/Ask the Expert/Become the Expert (Julie @ JulzReads)Three ways to join in this week! You can either share three or more books on a single topic that you have read and can recommend (be the expert), you can put the call out for good nonfiction on a specific topic that you have been dying to read (ask the expert), or you can create your own list of books on a topic that you’d like to read (become the expert).

#NonFicNov

  • I enjoy reading plays and learning about the ‘nuts and bolt’ of
  • writing and staging them.
  • Here a a few books about plays, playwrights and the theater.

 

Feedback for a comment @ Doing Dewey

  1. Plays reflect society in a very direct way.
  2. Death of a Salesman (post WW II consumerism and the American Dream)
  3. Raisin in the Sun (Black experience of trying
  4. to assimilate into white society, pros, cons)
  5. The Father (originally a French play, Le Pere)
  6. touching look how a son deals
  7. …with a father slipping into dementia.
  8. Fences  by August Wilson
  9. …Oscar winning movie 2016, Viola Davis Best Actress
  10. written 10 years after Arthur Miller’s play DoS set in 1950s is
  11. considered the black American version of Death of a Salesman.
  12. I could go on and on!
  13. If you just take one play…
  14. …do a little research
  15. …you never know where you’ll end up!
  16. Thanks for you comments and as always your
  17. Friday Non-fiction post that gives
  18. others an opportunity to share their NF reads!

 

Mapping Irish Theater

  • Mapping Irish Theater examines the
  • …relationship between a society and its theater.
  • Irish plays are deeply entrenched sense of place.
  • Published: 2013 (175 pg)

 

 

Kitchen Sink Realisms

  • Domestic labor has figured largely on American stages.
  • The genre  is “kitchen sink realism”.
  • Published: 2015 (304 pg)

 

Female Bodies on the American Stage

  • Dress size of a woman makes a bold  statement on stage!
  • Published: 2014 (239 pg)

Looking for Lorraine

  • First black female playwright
  • …whose play was produced on Broadway
  • Published: 2018 (256 pg)

Play: Raisin in the Sun

  • I’m adding this so you can see…
  • …why Hansberry was so important for the theater.
  • Opening:  New York City on March 11, 1959

 

 

 

Read more from plays
16 Comments Post a comment
  1. Nov 12 2018

    Nice list of recommendations! I’ve been wanting to read the Hansberry biography for a while, and I’ll have to bump it up on my list. Her plays are all compelling, and most of them have aged well in a way that isn’t true for some of the era’s other major playwrights.

    Like

    Reply
    • Nov 12 2018

      I’m trying to make a list of other playwrights to read that have ‘fallen between the cracks” Theodore Ward an Zona Gale for instance. I also want to read Anna Deavere Smith’s ‘Twilight, Los Angeles 1992. Thanks so much for stopping by and leaving a comment!

      Like

      Reply
  2. Nov 12 2018

    I might do this topic as well! I hope you don’t mind x

    Like

    Reply
    • Nov 12 2018

      Oh, wonderful…I love when I fine others who enjoy the theater/plays/playwrigts as much as I do!
      You have the enviable position of being able to go to see live performances I can only dream about! Can’t wait to see your post! Thanks for your comment!

      Like

      Reply
  3. Nov 12 2018

    I’ve heard about this book which might interest you Nancy – Fifty Playwrights on their Craft by Caroline Jester & Caridad Svich. But the best I can find for Aussie playwrights is this series link – https://brill.com/view/serial/AP

    Like

    Reply
    • Nov 12 2018

      I’ve read a few Aussie playwrights this year (see list plays for reviews)
      Cornelius, Purcell, Lee and Butler!
      # AWW does not review playwrights as a ‘genre’ as it does poets! Thanks for your suggestion and limk.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  4. Nov 13 2018

    These are great recommendations! I should get back to reading plays… maybe something in the genre of kitchen sick realism, I didn’t know that’s a thing, woah.

    Like

    Reply
    • Nov 13 2018

      Plays have a secret life…the fun is discovering what it is!
      Plays: reading time 2 hr? Just long enough for a good read in hectic times.
      Thanks for stopping by…and leaving your comments!

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  5. Nov 13 2018

    Some of those looks absolutely fascinating. I’ve had that Hansberry book on my TBR shelf for far too long. Great list!

    Like

    Reply
  6. Nov 14 2018

    What an interesting and thorough list!

    Like

    Reply
  7. Nov 16 2018

    wow, lots of good references here.

    Like

    Reply
  8. What an interesting topic! The only plays I’ve read (and almost the only ones I’ve watched) are Shakespeare’s, so this is definitely a topic outside my comfort zone.

    Like

    Reply
    • Nov 22 2018

      Plays reflect society in a very direct way.
      Death of a Salesman (post WW II consumerism and the American Dream)
      Raisin in the Sun (Black experience of trying to assimilate into white society, pros, cons)
      The Father (originally a French play, Le Pere) touching look how a son deals with a father slippping into dementia.
      Fences (…also Oscar winning movie 2016) written 10 years after Arthur Miller’s play DoS set in 1950s is considered the black American version of Death of a Salesman.
      I could go on and on! If you just take one play…do a little research you never know where you’ll end up! Thanks for you comments and as always your Friday Non-fiction post that gives others an opporunity ot share their NF reads!

      Like

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Note: HTML is allowed. Your email address will never be published.

Subscribe to comments

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: