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July 4, 2018

4

Classic: James Fenimore Cooper

by N@ncy

  • No, Daniel Day-Lewis did not appear in the movie version of Deerslayer
  • …but IMO he  is the best visual image I could find for
  • the main character….a  white scout who was raised by the Mohicans.

 

 

Introduction:

  1. I had to read this book in high school  English class.
  2. You luckily were spared this torment, I hope.
  3. I never shrink from a challenge and pledged Brona’s Books
  4. …I would try to re-read a book.
  5. Re-reading is against my literary religion.
  6. So I choose the only book I have actively blocked out of my memory.
  7. Now I will try to see what in heaven’s name made Mr Hughs
  8. select this book for my senior English exam.
  9. I graduated….so I must have read the book somehow!

 

Plot:

  1. Deerslayer and his Mohican blood-brother, Chingachgook
  2. stumble onto an old trapper Tom Hutter who asks for their help in
  3. ..protecting a crazy old man and  his two daughters from a Huron assault.
  4. Deerslayer reluctantly agrees and  meets the old
  5. …man on his floating fort in the middle of the river.
  6. The crazy codger hates Indians.
  7. This has brought the wrath of the Hurons down on him.
  8. Hutter flatters his oldest daughter (Judith) while
  9. …telling his youngest (Hetty)  that she’s feeble-minded.
  10. Deerslayer has suspicions about the whole set-up.
  11. (no spoilers)
  12. There is a love triangle:
  13. Deerslayer – Harry March – Judith Hutter

 

Setting:    Lake Otsego = Lake Glimmerglass in the book

 

Weak point:   class distinction (pg 30) – not a weak point…but hard to read.

  1. This is what people thought in 1846:
  2. White is the highest color and therefore the best man.
  3. Black is put to live in the neighborhood of the white man
  4. …and fit to be made use of.
  5. Red comes last…those that made them never
  6. …expected the Indian to be accounted as more than half human.

 

Notes:

28.06.2018 – #20BooksOfSummer #ReReadChallenge
If you buy the E-book version only choose Penguin Classic edition. Design and fonts are so important The cheaper books use a font that is ugly and embedded.

29.06.2018 – #20BooksOfSummer #ReReadChallenge
I need a good glass of Cru Bourgeois Chateau La Tour de Bessan Margaux 2010 to start The Deerslayer by J.F. Cooper. #ReReadChallenge.
Deerslayer must choose between uprightness of heart vs false pride and frontier boastfulness.

30.06.2018 – #20BooksOfSummer #ReReadChallenge
Making good progress and must read 5 chapters a day.
Busy morning in canoe with Chingachgook and Deerslayer on Glimmerglass Lake (Lake Otsego in upstate New York).

01.07.2018 – #20BooksOfSummer #ReReadChallenge
The book reflects the styles and attitudes of another time. Cooper wants his message of Christian morals to pervade. Revenge should be avoided and we should forgive…”turn the other cheek”. Who ever heard of a young girl (Hetty) fleeing from wild savages Huron Indians…stop after gathering dried leaves for a bed…and kneel to say The Lord’s Prayer. #HardToBelieve

03.07.2018 – #20BooksOfSummer #ReReadChallenge
Busy night: Mysterious floating moccasin found, Tom Hutter is scalped and left to die, Judith Hutter refuses Harry March’s proposal of marriage, Hetty Hutter is still reading the bible, Deerslayer is held captive by the Huron braves
…and England finally won a penalty shoot-out in World Championship Soccer 2018.
ENG-SWEDEN   1/4 final!  is this Saturday, don’t miss it!

 

Conclusion:

  1. This is a classic about the early America era.
  2. It is filled with adventures, violence and clever escapes
  3. …but most importantly a few dirty secrets emerges.
  4. Did I like the book after RE-READING it after  50 years?

 

Last Thoughts:
This book has stalked me for 50 years.
I had to read it for high school English.
I have wondered why Mr Hughes assigned
this book to a giddy group of teen-age girls.
Is there a message in this book that
will help us starting our lives?

I think it is in chapter 30:

  • “It’s true that you being female will most likely
  • save you from torments but it will not save your
  • liberty and may not save your scalp.”


James Fenimore Cooper was an enlightend man.
I am indebted to him
….because I still have my scalp!

4 Comments Post a comment
  1. Jul 5 2018

    I’m glad you discovered one of the joys of the reread – finding a quote or phrase that you missed first time, but has now proved to be significant to you. One of the other ones being how a reread ties you to that first time, that younger you, bringing back memories, thoughts and feelings of long ago – how 17 yr old Nancy is almost sitting along side current you as you reread the same book with different eyes and different experiences under your belt.

    Would 17 yr old Nancy have given a hoot about the World Cup quarter final?
    I love that you included that 🙂
    Now that the socceroos are out, I’m barracking for Belgium.

    Like

    Reply
    • Jul 5 2018

      Finding a quote I missed? I missed the entire book! I have no recollection at all.
      Yes, this is a classic and written when religion and honor were important issues that Fenimore wanted to express while praising the American pioneer spirit!
      That last sentence would have been an excellent start for an exam question!
      That is the difference between 17-67…I i’ve learned how to read. I wish
      school in my time spent more time teaching book analysis. I had to do it myself.
      World Cup is something I learned about in NL. Our national team has produced over the years some great players and coaches…..who have helped the #Socceroos !
      I like Belgium – I admire England for breaking the ‘penalty curse’ – I am sick on Brazil clowing around (Neymar whining like a baby) – I’m surprised Russia got this far – I am cautious about Croatia, they manage to keep on going – and… who said there are no vikings ….just watch Sweden battle with England Saturday 07.07.2018!

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. #20BooksOfSummer 2018 | NancyElin
  2. Classic Club Master List | NancyElin

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