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November 13, 2017

8

Classics Club Spin #16

by N@ncy

” I can’t look…..what is the number for #16 CC spin?”

 

What is the spin?

  1. Before next Friday, November 17th, create a post to list your choice of any
  2. twenty books that remain “to be read” on your Classics Club list.
  3. Try to challenge yourself.
  4. This is your Spin List. 
  5. On Friday, November 17th, we’ll post a number from 1 through 20.
  6. The challenge: read whatever book falls under that number
  7. on your Spin List by December 31, 2017.
  8. Check is in here in January!

 

  • I have selected 20 classic plays…..on my TBR.
  • Here is the list:

 

1.  Death of a Salesman (1949) by Arthur Miller

2. A Streetcar Named Desire (1947) by Tennessee Williams

3. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?: (1962) by Edward Albee

4. Long Day’s Journey into Night (1956) by Eugene O’Neill –   READING !!

5. Fences (1985) by August Wilson

6. The Lieutenant of Inishmore (2001) by Martin McDonagh

7. Waiting for Godot: A Tragicomedy in Two Acts (1953) by Samuel Beckett

8. Pygmalion (1913) by George Bernard Shaw

9. A Raisin in the Sun (1959) by Lorraine Hansberry

10. Our Town (1938) by Thornton Wilder

11. Present Laughter (1942) by Noel Coward

12. The Glass Menagerie (1944) by Tennessee Williams

13. Glengarry Glen Ross(1984) by David Mamet

14. August: Osage County (2007) by Tracy Letts

15. Ruined (2008) by Lynn Nottage

16. The Iceman Cometh (1946) by Eugene O’Neill

17. Look Back in Anger (1956) by John Osborne

18. Master Harold and the Boys (1982) by Athol Fugard

19. The Little Foxes. (1939) by Lillian Hellman

20. The Real Thing (1982) by Tom Stoppard

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8 Comments Post a comment
  1. Nov 13 2017

    So many of my favourite plays on this list!

    Like

    Reply
    • Nov 13 2017

      I want to read 50 of the best plays written in the last 100 years.
      This is my starting list….for 2018. I’ll use the spin as a ‘kick-off’
      I want to read ‘about the playwright’ so I can understand his backround.
      That always is the basis for many of the writer’s plays.
      Thanks for you comment!

      Like

      Reply
  2. Nov 13 2017

    I love how you research the playwright before you read their plays. I studied a couple of George Bernard Shaw plays at school….and that’s probably the last time I read a play!

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    Reply
    • Nov 14 2017

      I love to discover all that is in a outwardly simple play.
      It really is like a book (character changes….interior en exterior conflicts…setting)
      …but it all happen usually in one isolated place. Often I look for a ‘mother figure.
      Mother’s influence writrs more than you realize (Shirley Jackson, for example).
      Shakespeare is the exception….he moves his scenes all over the place!

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  3. Nov 14 2017

    I have been curious about A Raising in the Sun… Whichever play you get to read, I hope you’ll enjoy it.

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    Reply
    • Nov 14 2017

      They say Death of a Salesman is the BEST American play in the last 100 years.
      I would have loved to have seen Philip Seymour Hoffman in the role….a great actor who we have lost too soon. I hope I get #1 !

      Like

      Reply
  4. Best of luck with this! I’m out this time but I’ll be watching everyone else’s choices. I think I’d vote for Death of a Salesman.

    Like

    Reply
    • Nov 15 2017

      Thanks Cleo ….for your comment!
      At the end of the year reading a play is all I can manage
      for a spin! I’m trying to wrap-up challenges ( ..often self-imposed) and making plans for 2018.
      Hope you are feeling better!
      PS: finally reading your beloved ‘War and Peace’ ! I’m going to go back and read your reveiw about it!

      Like

      Reply

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