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September 16, 2017

8

Common Sense

by N@ncy

 

 

What is Common Sense?

  1. The pamphlet came into circulation in January 1776
  2. ….after the Revolution had started.
  3. Common Sense spurred most states, cities, towns and counties to write
  4. …their own Declarations in the spring of 1776.
  5. Common Sense  is regarded as one of the founding documents of the United States.
  6. Thomas Paine became one of the most celebrated patriot writers in US history.

 

Conclusion:

  1. I wanted to continue  reading the histories list.
  2. An audio book is the best option to  ‘read’ Thomas Paine’s  Common Sense.
  3. This book is not easy listening at the beginning
  4. .but gets better!
  5. Paine’s style is of his day and age and seems strange to the  21st C  reader.
  6. I listened and tried to find the ‘essence’ of Paine’s message.
  7. That means letting many curlicue phrases drift from ear to ear
  8. but drawing out the essence of the book.
  9. Paine begins his book with  the need for government, the farce that is monarchy,
  10. the folly of heredity right  and the  deplorable English Constitution.
  11. These chapters were good but not great.
  12. I was glad to discover Paine shines in the next selections.
  13. Paine’s thoughts on the American situation are excellent!
  14. Paine emphasizes that he writes only…
  15. plains facts, arguments and common sense.
  16. While reading I wondered if we could use more to this in the
  17. …present US administration and less fake news.

 

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8 Comments Post a comment
  1. Sep 16 2017

    I’m glad you had some silver needle tea to soothe your way with this one!!

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    • Sep 16 2017

      Silver Needle Tea is replacing morning coffee! I feel so in the NOW when drinking it! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  2. Sep 16 2017

    Really interesting. I can’t help reflect that old adage of history repeating – if Paine were here today looking at the madness of Trump or the madness of Brexit he’d repeat that phrase ‘These are times that try men’s souls!’

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    • Sep 16 2017

      …i think Paine would have said much more! WT?!

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      Reply
    • Sophie
      Sep 16 2017

      Talking of history repeating itself, it is interesting to consider that the 20s and 30s are repeating in micro form… First with a strong recession and austerity and now with a rise in fascism and closed borders to migrants. Perhaps with North Korea we are entering the 40s (though I personally doubt there will be a war, surely it will be suicide on NK’s part from a purely geographical point of view of area needed to bomb).
      Your review is fascinating and informative as ever, I like your description of ‘letting many curlicue phrases drift from ear to ear’ and just searching for the essence of the book. Sometimes you have to wonder whether the obscure and grandiose passages are just verbal padding or if it adds something to the text and it is not just an artistic flourish…

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      Reply
      • Sep 16 2017

        History repeating itself….indeed, and it is frightening.
        I found Paine’s language grandiloquent but he was probably trying to whip up political passions in the colonies. De Tocqueville in contrast was an objective observer in Democracy in America. Hie book was very structured and easier to read. His comparisons between the democratic feelings in America and in Europe were very good.
        Next history? I’d like to finally read about President L.B Johnson. He was a consummate southern politician: R. Caro’s book “The Path to Power”.
        Thanks for you comments!

        Like

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